Category: creativity

Let’s join the Department of Mesmerizing Zoetr…

Let’s join the Department of Mesmerizing Zoetropes as they marvel at these spellbinding phenakistoscope discs created by Graphic Designer Drew Tetz (previously featured here).

Highlights from my first three months making analog animations on my lasercutter.
Phenakistoscopes were one of the first forms of animation, using the persistence of vision effect to blur multiple images into one moving picture. Early forms relied on slits & mirrors to trick the eye, modern versions often use a strobe or a camera’s shutter speed to trigger the animation. These lasercut discs spring to life when placed on a record player & viewed through a camera.

Follow Drew Tetz on Instagram to check out more of his awesome animated records.

Vienna and Zagreb-based artist collective Nume…

Vienna and Zagreb-based artist collective Numen / For Use used humble packing tape to create site-specific interactive art installation in the Des Moines Art Center. Simply titled Tape, the installation creates translucent webbed passages stretching between the lower and upper sections of the center’s I. M. Pei gallery. Visitors are welcome to explore these passages just as long as they take off their shoes first.

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Lightness and translucency of the installation are highly accentuated by radical contrast between the structure and the rough, Brutalist concrete surface and expressive geometric composition of the gallery building. Deriving from of such a dominant host, the parasite structure formed an organic representation of actual spatial flux of the building. The inhabitable structure of the installation thus followed the major trajectories of visitors movements, enabling them to move along the usual paths, only in an elevated, enclosed, surreal space of Tape.

Visit the Numen / For Use website or Facebook page to check out more of their work, including other packing tape installations created in Paris, Frankfurt, and Vienna.

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[via Colossal]

The Department of Extraordinary Upcycling appr…

The Department of Extraordinary Upcycling appreciates that pretty much anything can be used as a canvas. Coxsackie, NY-based visual artist and designer Ruby Silvious uses used tea bags as her canvas for miniature paintings.

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Follow Ruby Silvious on Instagram to check out more of her beautiful paintings created on tiny, recycled canvases.

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[via lustik]

New York-based street artist Tom Bob (previous…

New York-based street artist Tom Bob (previously featured here) continues to transform unassuming aspects of the urban landscape into colorful characters. A fire hydrant becomes Princess Leia, pipes become wriggling, polka dotted sneks, and a garbage can out in front of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum becomes a mighty Trojan warrior.

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Follow Tom Bob on Instagram to keep up with his latest creative urban interventions.

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[via Twisted Sifter]

Today the Department of Extraordinary Upcyclin…

Today the Department of Extraordinary Upcycling is enjoying For Fun, a series of anthropomorphic characters created and beautifully photographed by Warsaw-based artist and illustrator Robert Romanowicz using a wide variety of old household tools and other everyday objects.

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In the hands of Spanish sculptor Gerard Mas 15…

In the hands of Spanish sculptor Gerard Mas 15th century ladies (and the occasional gentleman) exchange their Renaissance poise for modern day whimsy and sarcasm. Each marble sculpture depicts a period figure doing something decidedly uncharacteristic for their time, such as chewing gum, picking their nose, enjoying a lollipop, sporting tattoos or bikini tan lines, and doing a headstand.

“I thought about the millions of attitudes and situations that old artworks couldn’t capture because they were simply inappropriate for a lady in the 15th century,” Mas says. “I decided to try to do it in an old media and style. It was something like an invented old art. After that, the anachronisms came and pop elements, too, as a natural evolution.”

Follow Gerard Mas on Instagram to check out more of his delightfully anachronistic sculptures.

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[via Bored Panda]

Welcome back to Surreal Sunday where the Depar…

Welcome back to Surreal Sunday where the Department of Awesome Camouflage is enjoying these clever collaborations by knitter Nina Dodd, aka The Duke of Woollington, and photographer Joseph Ford

Entitled Knitted Camouflage, this series feature models wearing Dodd’s custom hand-knit sweaters that make their torsos (and sometimes entire bodies) perfectly blend into their surroundings where they’re photographed by Ford. They even created a custom doggo sweater and collaborated with French street artist Monsieur Chat, who created on of his trademark cat murals as the background for a photo.

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[via Colossal]

The Department of Stupendous Stonework is thri…

The Department of Stupendous Stonework is thrilled to welcome its newest member: Yorkshire, England-based artist and stonemason Johnny Clasper, who creates stunning dry stone structures, free-form stone sculptures, and beautiful pebble mosaics.

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Visit Johnny Clasper’s website or follow him on Facebook to check out more of his stunning stone art as well as shots of works in progress.

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[via Twisted Sifter and Bored Panda]

Over two years have passed since the Departmen…

Over two years have passed since the Department of Awesomely Good Deeds first discovered an awesome ongoing program called The Monster Project (previously featured here) which is all about helping children “recognize the power of their own imaginations and to encourage them to pursue their creative potential.” Based in Austin, TX, The Monster Project invites elementary school students to draw monsters and send them in. Then their team of over 100 professional artists recreates the monsters in their own artistic styles and later shares them with the kids in person.

“…when we deliver these new interpretations back to the students in person, we are able to demonstrate new art techniques within their original creative context. They are able to see what their idea sparked in others.”

Head over to Bored Panda or visit The Monster Project Gallery to check out even more pairings of kids’ monsters and their professional recreations.

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Follow The Monster Project on Instagram to keep up with their latest collaborations.

[via Bored Panda]

The Department of Top-Notch Textile Art can’t …

The Department of Top-Notch Textile Art can’t get enough of knitted food sculptures lately. It might have something to do with their New Year’s resolutions. Today they’re wishing they had some knitted cheese and crocheted crackers to go with these 100% wool sausages knitted by French textile charcuterie Maison Cisson.

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[via  lustik ]